It is time you share the whisper!

10 February 2014
Stan Lebar: “We Knew We Had A Problem”
 
Stan Lebar led the Westinghouse Electric Corporation team that developed the lunar black and white camera. In 2009 he was present during the Newseum presentation of the newly restored Apollo 11 tapes. Mr Stan Lebar had to tell us something that we should not ignore “I have been asked for many years what I thought about when I first saw the camera”. He goes on to explain what he thought, “What we saw at that point was rather disturbing because it was not what we had simulated and we knew we had a problem and, er, that would, er, concern me for some 40 years, so that’s what I experienced at that point in time and that’s what I remember…”.
At the end of the 40 year anniversary in front of the world press he reads a letter he had just received that morning.
“I have something that I want to share with you, um, we have a gentleman we had mentioned earlier named Colin Mckellar, who is part of our search team and he’s in Sydney Australia and he’s a historian, besides working with us, he is a historian on Apollo, and he has been over time in communication with Neil Armstrong, and they have communicated quite frequently. Now they’re having a big celebration down in Australia for the 40th and he asked Neil if he could write something for them that he could read at this 40th anniversary bash, and he sent me the letter that Neil wrote, it was not a small letter it was quite long, and in it was a paragraph that he pointed my attention to. It’s the only time I ever heard Neil comment on the camera, as he was on the moon and he’s commenting on the camera about when he was on the moon and what he thought at the time. So it’s a rather interesting document because he sort of sums up what most of us felt. So I’d like to read this little excerpt for you and it goes like this:
“I remember all the pre-flight testing we were doing on that little black and white image TV camera. In all that testing I never saw a picture successfully transmitted but the chaps assured us that it would and in fact work, and it did. And I was probably the most surprised person in the human race when mission control announced they were getting a picture. So I was never concerned that the picture quality was less then optimum I was just amazed that there was any picture at all.”
And I like to tell you that going back in time this was never a sure thing. The links from the transmission from the moon, to the tracking sites, that the converter, that the huge tracking transmission that went to Houston, all of these, anyone of these, could have caused, if there was any blurb at all it could have had a failure and no image. So his comment at the time that it isn’t quality, was less than optimum, our general feeling was when we saw the image that was very degraded, well what we felt at the time, we’ve got a picture! and to us it was the most unbelievable miracle that anyone could have that here we had the image and the world saw it. So, it’s an interesting little statement by Neil.”"
Stan Lebar the man who developed one of the cameras tells “What we saw at that point was rather disturbing… because it was not what we had simulated and we knew we had a problem” and that it had concerned him for some 40 years. NASA has told us for 45 years now that there is nothing wrong with the footage. People who question this are called attention seekers and conspirators.
Neil,
1 Neil never saw a picture successfully transmitted during testing.
2 Neil was the most surprised person in the human race when mission control announced “we’re getting a picture”.
3 Neil was never concerned about the picture quality.
4 Neil was just amazed that there was any picture at all.
Stan Lebar,
1 What we saw at that point was rather disturbing.
2 It was not what we had simulated.
3 We knew we had a problem.
4 It has concerned him for some 40 years.
The black and white film material is faked that means the photo material is also fake as it looks the same. Stan led the Westinghouse Electric Corporation team that developed the lunar camera that brought the televised news images of Neil Armstrong stepping onto the moon to more than 500 million people on Earth. He died on Wednesday, Dec. 23rd, 2009. RIP Stan thank you for your brave and bold
statements that you have shared with us. It is time you all join the journey towards the truth for all mankind.